THE DORGAN FAMILY

OF

CARRIGKILTER

CIVIL PARISH OF BALLINTEMPLE, EAST CORK

 AND

BALLYBRAHER

CIVIL PARISH OF CLOYNE, EAST CORK

The first, oldest and directly connected Dorgan is Timothy Dargan (Dorgan) and his wife, Johanna. They are the Grandparents of Patrick Dargan who married Ann Flynn. I suspect Timothy Dargan is our oldest ancestor based on the family graves at Ballymacoda Hill Cemetery. There are three DARGAN (DORGAN) graves immediately on the right side after the entrance gate. One of the graves reads:

  • ? erected (unable to read this line)
  • To the Memory of
  • Johanna Dorgan
  • who died March 9th 1823
  • Aged 73 years
  • Rest in peace.

Timothy Dargan and his wife Joahanna had two known children: Mary Dargan and Edmond Dargan.

Mary Dargan died very young at 21 years old. Her father, Timothy, erected a headstone in Ballymacoda Cemetery that reads:

  • This stone was
  • erected by
  • Timothy Dorgan
  • in memory of his
  • daughter Mary who
  • Dept. this life Sept.
  • 1th 1800 Aged 21 years
  • May her soul Rest in peace
  • Amen.

Edmond Dargan married but the name of his wife is not known. They had two known children: John Dargan and Patrick Dargan.

John Dargan erected a headstone to the memory of his father in the Ballymacoda Cemetery Edmond that reads:

  • Erected by John Dorgan
  • of Kilmachill
  • in mem. of his beloved father
  • Edmond Dorgan
  • who died Dec. 24th 1877
  • Aged 78.

Griffiths Valuation lists John Dargan living in Garryvoe, Garryvoe Lower in 1853. He married Mary Burke. I found this notation in the CMCR Project (Christening, Marriage, Cemetery Record) Project Marriage Registry:

  • County: Cork
  • Groom_Given: John
  • Groom_Surname: Dorgan
  • Bride_Given: Mary
  • Bride_Surname: Burke
  • Groom_Residence:
  • Brides_Residence :
  • Marriage_Date: 08/02/1831
  • Church_or_Location: Killeagh
  • Priest: J. Noonan
  • Witness1: Wm Burke
  • Witness2: Dl Ahern
  • Record_Source: National Library of Ireland

Griffiths Valuation lists John Dargan living in Garryvoe, Garryvoe Lower in 1853. He married Mary Burke. I found this notation in the CMCR Project (Christening, Marriage, Cemetery Record) Project Marriage Registry:

  • County: Cork
  • Groom_Given: John
  • Groom_Surname: Dorgan
  • Bride_Given: Mary
  • Bride_Surname: Burke
  • Groom_Residence:
  • Brides_Residence :
  • Marriage_Date: 08/02/1831
  • Church_or_Location: Killeagh
  • Priest: J. Noonan
  • Witness1: Wm Burke
  • Witness2: Dl Ahern
  • Record_Source: National Library of Ireland

John Dargan and Mary Burke had three known children: Edmund, John who married Nora and Francis. There is a Francis Dargin of Ballycrenane, Cloyne Parish who is listed in Griffith’s Valuation 1851-1853. I am not sure if this Francis is the son of John Dorgan and Mary Burke.

Here is what is known of Edmund Dorgan, the son of John Dargan and Mary Burke:

Birth Place:    Kilmacahill, County Cork, Ireland

Father:    John Dorgan (-1873)

Mother:    Mary Burke

Griffith’s Valuation of 1851-53 lists an Edmond Dargin who had a House, Offices, and 11 acres and 3 roods of land in Kilmacahill.  Edmund’s marriage certificate lists him as a farmer of Kilmacahill.  He moved to Mary Scannell’s home in Sheenless when they were married.

He is buried in the Hill Cemetery, Ballymacoda, Parish of Ladysbridge, East Cork.  His headstone reads:

“Erected by John Dorgan of Killmacahill in memory of his beloved father Edmund Dorgan who died Dec. 24th 1877 Aged 78.”

Spouse:        Mary Scannell

Birth Place:  Sheenless, County Cork, Ireland

Father:          John Scannell (-<1890) Griffith’s Valuation lists John Scannell in Sheanliss who had a house, offices, and land: 2 acres, 1 rood, 29 perches & 27 acres, 1 rood and 34 perches.  He also had an adjoining plot with a house occupied by Patrick Browne.

Marr Date:    21 JAN 1890

Marr Place:   St. Coleman’s Church, Cloyne, County Cork, Ireland

Witnesses:    John Dorgan and Nora Dorgan (Edmund’s brother and sister)

Mary Scannell was a widow when she married Edmund Dorgan.  Her first husband was a man named Rohan.  He could have been a Ronayne rather than Rohan since these names are often confused in the records. Her father, John Scannell, was deceased when she married Edmond Dorgan in 1890.

Children:

Ellen

Birth Date:    29 OCT 1890

Birth Place:   Sheenless, County Cork, Ireland

John

Birth Date:    29 OCT 1890

Birth Place:   Sheenless, County Cork, Ireland

William

Birth Date:    26 DEC 1891

Birth Place:    Sheenless, County Cork, Ireland

William was born at 2 AM.

Bridget

Birth Date:    26 DEC 1891

Birth Place:    Sheenless, County Cork, Ireland

Bridget was born at 3 AM.

Margaret

Birth Date:    5 NOV 1894

Birth Place:    Sheenless, County Cork, Ireland

Johannah

Birth Date:    19 APR 1896

Birth Place:    Sheenless, County Cork, Ireland

Patrick Dargan, the brother of  John Dargan of Garryvoe, is our direct ancestor and the starting point of the Dorgan Family Website.

This is a copy of the original map of Ballybraher, c. 1840

Ballycotton was mentioned in the Townland listings as Ballycottin (town, townland, and island) although it is shown as Ballycotton on the Townland Index maps and, of course, the Discovery maps. Ballycotton is about 10 miles SE of Middleton and 15 miles SW of Youghal, and is located on – what else – Ballycotton Bay. The largish (over 550 acres) townland of Ballybraher is situated to the immediate west and northwest of Ballycotton and nearly isolates it from the rest of Co. Cork. The dividing line between the civil parishes of Cloyne (eastern portion) and Kilmahon passes through the townland, hence it is listed under both parishes. The other Ballybraher listing is up in Ballyoughtera parish, near Castlemartyr.

BALLYBRAHER, CIVIL PARISH OF CLOYNE, EAST COUNTY CORK, C. 1840

This is a description of the nearby townland of Ballycotton in 1837:

From Lewis’s Topographical Dictionary of Ireland, 1837

Ballycotton

BALLYCOTTON, a village and plough-land, in the parish of CLOYNE, barony of IMOKILLY, county of Cork, and province of MUNSTER, 4 miles (S. E.) from Cloyne; containing 856 inhabitants.

 BALLYCOTTON HARBOUR AND BALLYCOTTON ISLAND

This is an isolated portion of the parish, situated on the shore of a bay of the same name in St. George’s channel, six miles from Poor Head, and consists of a scattered village comprising about 150 small houses: it is much frequented in the summer for sea-bathing.  At the entrance of the bay are two isles called the Ballycotton islands, situated five miles  (w. by s.) from Capell or Cable Island, and about one mile from the main land. This is one of the five stations of the coast-guard that are comprised within the district of Youghal. A new district church for the accommodation of the inhabitants of Ballycotton and Churchtown was built not far from the village, in 1835, at an expense of £330, raised by subscription.

The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Bishop; and the curate’s stipend is paid partly by the dean and chapter and the vicars choral of the cathedral church of Cloyne, to whom the tithes of the parish belong, and partly by the precentor, as rector of Churchtown. The male and female parochial schools for Ballycotton, Churchtown, and Kilmahon are situated at Ballybraher.  For an overview of the townlands of Cloyne see Brenden Sisk‘s excellent map and descriptions:  

1803-1853: DORGAN TRANSPORTATIONS TO AUSTRALIA

DORGANS were transported to Australia for various “crimes”, especially during “An Gorta Mor“, the Great Starvation. During the famine period 1845-1851 the port of departure for deportation and immigration was usually Cork City, not Cobh/Cove/Queenstown, and the destination would probably have been Liverpool which is where most of the emigrant vessels departed from for North America and Australia. It was also common for vessels unloading timber from Canada in West Cork ports to take passengers as ballast on the return voyage at a minimal charge. You brought your own bedding and food.

Queenstown did not become the main port of departure for County Cork until the latter half of the 19th century when steam-powered vessels began to dominate the trans-Atlantic passenger trade. Before this time, large sailing vessels were reluctant to waste time maneuvering into the Cove of Cork when they could sail fully loaded from Liverpool. Small sailing vessels and paddle wheel steamers made the mid-century runs between Cork and England, the cargo holds stuffed with bacon, hams, beef, butter, eggs, grain and other produce and the open decks crowded with starving Irish fleeing their homes and country for ports unknown.